scifi-fantasy-horror:

Valkyrie statue by ALEXANDRA KHITROVA

mrjakeparker:

Rocket Raccoon!

Print here.

hifructosemag:

There’s a reason Hi-Fructose keeps tabs on Tokyo artist Shohei (aka Hakuchi) Otomo(featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 20). The only son of great manga artist Katsuhiro Otomo, the acclaimed writer and director of the anime cult classic Akira, Hakuchi carries on his father’s legacy with his own graphic illustrations that combine Japanese iconography with a dark, retro-punk edge and a healthy dose of sardonic humor. Read more on Hi-Fructose.

lokis-green-and-golden-queen:

yes please I’d like them all thank you

apolloniasaintclair:

Apollonia Saintclair 526 - 20140917 L’entracte (The party break)

apolloniasaintclair:

Apollonia Saintclair 526 - 20140917 L’entracte (The party break)

narutoffee:

"Hmm... How can I say this..? My first impression is...
"I don't like you guys!!"
watchitdry:

#art #artist #artwork #oil #oils #oilpainting #female #figure #nude  #redwall #painting #watchitdry

watchitdry:

#art #artist #artwork #oil #oils #oilpainting #female #figure #nude #redwall #painting #watchitdry

innsamling:

Death on a Pale Horse (?), c. 1825-30Joseph Mallord William Turner (English, 1775-1851)Oil on canvas, 597 x 756 mm (support)Tate Gallery, Britain
Display caption:Although possibly incomplete, the subject can be identified as Death, the last of the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse who announce the Day of Judgement (Book of Revelation). The choice may have been in response to the death of Turner’s father in 1829, suggested by the unusual treatment which is both tender and menacing. Death appears, not as a triumphant, upright figure astride his horse, but as a phantom emerging from a turbulent mist: his skeletal form, arms outstretched, and draped submissively over the horse’s pale back. Such disturbing visions were considered to embody the very concept of the Sublime.

innsamling:

Death on a Pale Horse (?), c. 1825-30
Joseph Mallord William Turner (English, 1775-1851)
Oil on canvas, 597 x 756 mm (support)
Tate Gallery, Britain

Display caption:
Although possibly incomplete, the subject can be identified as Death, the last of the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse who announce the Day of Judgement (Book of Revelation). The choice may have been in response to the death of Turner’s father in 1829, suggested by the unusual treatment which is both tender and menacing. Death appears, not as a triumphant, upright figure astride his horse, but as a phantom emerging from a turbulent mist: his skeletal form, arms outstretched, and draped submissively over the horse’s pale back. Such disturbing visions were considered to embody the very concept of the Sublime.

espritdulouve:

Unsure source. Led me all around when I tried to find it. Feel free to add in if you know.

espritdulouve:

Unsure source. Led me all around when I tried to find it. Feel free to add in if you know.

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